Prevention, management and resolution
Torino,
29 June-10 July 2020

The Engaging Conflict Summer School is designed to equip committed students, early-career researchers and professionals with advanced tools to critically understand conflict and tackle it as a dynamic reality. Engaging Conflict's faculty draws from a unique spectrum of expertise to train a select group of participants in assessing the complexity of conflict and post-conflict scenarios, and evaluating the relevance and impact of different policy choices or normative standings, from non-intervention to conflict prevention and peacebuilding.

The Engaging Conflict Summer School is designed to equip committed students, early-career researchers and professionals with advanced tools to critically understand conflict and tackle it as a dynamic reality. Engaging Conflict's faculty draws from a unique spectrum of expertise to train a select group of participants in assessing the complexity of conflict and post-conflict scenarios, and evaluating the relevance and impact of different policy choices or normative standings, from non-intervention to conflict prevention.

Introduction to the Engaging Conflict Summer School
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Event
3/5/2020
Engaging Conflict 2020: moving to online format
Organizing committee

Due to the global pandemic, Engaging Conflict 2020 will be held in online format.

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T.note
14/1/2020
The contribution of civil society organizations in responding to terrorism in Uganda
Helen Nambalirwa Nkabala, Kanakulya Dickson, Venerandah Mbabazi

Measures to counter extreme violence are often assumed to be effective when in fact more research and analysis is required to better understand their actual effectiveness and impact. Most studies on African responses to terrorism focus solely on state-led interventions, with little attention being paid to non-state agency. Acknowledging this gap, in 2016, Makerere University launched a research project funded by the United States Institute for Peace on the nature, impact and effectiveness of counter-terrorism and peacebuilding activities carried out by non-state actors, particularly CSOs.

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T.note
14/5/2019
Increasing public confidence and satisfaction in policing through a victim-centred approach: a pilot project in Kosovo
William Brame, Giuseppe Lettieri

Citizens’ confidence in policing agencies represents a performance indicator of police reliability, trustworthiness and understanding of communities’ concerns. Many studies proved that citizens’ perceptions of policing agencies directly affect the police’s capacity to tackle crime and be aware of major security and safety concerns of local communities. Moreover, cases in which an improved service was provided to different typologies of victims showed positive effects on the overall level of confidence in police work. This becomes particularly true in countries that have experienced conflict, violence and political turmoil, where the police are often associated with the ruling power and those that have committed atrocities and severe violations of human rights.

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